Archive for the ‘Halloween’ Category

Club Class Halloween

Thursday, November 1st, 2012

I had my students (boys team versus girls team) make costumes out of newspaper. I wish I could show them to you, as the girls’ costumes (a Peter Pan and a Tinkerbell) were really well constructed, and the boys’ costume (a Tinkerbell… with a sword through his head and handcuffs? Apparently he was Tinkerbell after being caught by Hook) was just strange, but I don’t want to post pictures without their permission. They were epic, though, and they both chose to do Tinkerbell independent of each other.

I WILL however post a picture of myself, in the girls’ Peter Pan hat, which they gifted me afterwards.

ZOMBIE ATTACK: Weapons List

Tuesday, November 1st, 2011

Well, my students are prepared.

We started off by explaining how to tell who is a zombie, then we got straight to the point – zombies like brains. Changpyeong High School students have great brains. Ergo, ZOMBIE ATTACK.

(note this is not my lesson, just someone else’s lesson that I adapted)

I split my students into groups and gave each group a folder (or some groups shared) with 5 weapons or materials, and they had to come up with pros, cons, and how to use each item. Each folder had different items. Then they had to switch groups and give me back the folders and from memory in their new groups decide which 4 of the 15 items they would keep and how they would use them. Anyone who survived got candy, anyone who died became zombie candy. To push creativity I told the classes that the most creative group got two pieces of candy.   

Weapon’s List:

Baseball Bat: A regular, wooden baseball bat.

Chainsaw: This chainsaw comes in either “scary-looking, manly” or “pink Gucci” style. You get 6 Liters of gasoline with the chainsaw.

Flamethrower: This flamethrower can shoot fire 8 meters. You get 6 Liters of gasoline with the flamethrower.

Blankets: Enough blankets for everyone in your group. It’s November – you might get cold.

Matches: These waterproof matches will still work if you get them wet!

Megaphone

Rope: 110 meters of very strong rope.

Shotgun: This shotgun comes with a case of shotgun shells (bullets). 1 case has 20 boxes of shells inside. 1 box has 25 shells inside.

Spam: This is a LIFETIME supply of spam. Yum.

Bamboo

Kimchi: It’s really spicy, and good for your health!

Wood and a Nail Gun: This is an unlimited supply of wood planks, a nail gun, and an unlimited supply of nails.

An Axe

 A Dog

A Mirror
_____________________________________

The kids who got the typical weapons (like “shotgun” “axe” etc) had a much easier time coming up with pros, but my favorites are the atypical ones:

Kimchi:
Pro: Prevent cancer
Con: Very Spicy
We can use this to rub into Zombie’s eye

Pro: We can eat it while we are hungry.
Con: It’s not a good weapon, and we need rice to eat it.

Pro: We can eat when we are hungry.
Con: It’s hard to cut zombie’s head.
We can throw it for zombie’s eyes interrupt to zombie’s sight.

Pro: We – Koreans – have to eat kimchi
Con: It raises our osmotic pressure, so we need water a lot.
It’s good for our health

Pro: It can recharge our energy to fight them. It can fascinate zombie by awesome taste.
Con: It’s so spicy.
We can use this to paralyze zombie’s sight.

Pro: We can make zombie embarrassed
Con: No die
We can use this to cover zombie’s eye.

Pro: When we throw it, zombie can’t walk easily so we can earn time to attack them. And we can be healthy.
Con: We can’t kill them directly.
We can use it to hinder zombie’s walking.

Megaphone:
Pro: Save the energy
Con: too loud
We can use it to bomb the Zombie’s eardrum

A dog:
Pro: Enticement
Con: Not human (so zombi’s not eat the dog)
How to use it: if we are dangerous [i.e. if we are in danger] a dog come across so dog dead.

Pro: It can make zombies come, “cute” and we can eat it.
Con: So noisy and can’t control.

Baseball bat:
Pro: Strong, light, and easy to swing. We can play baseball.
Con: Breakable.

Pro: It’s hard, long, so that we can safe us from zombies. If we break baseball bat, we can use shaped part to kill zombies.
Con: The more we use shaped part the more it wears out
We can use this to homerun zombie’s heads.

An Axe:
Pro: This is ‘Man’s’ Romance
Con: It’s too heavy
We can use this to cut zombie’s heads.

Flamethrower:
Pro: This is sexy weapon
Con: It’s too hot
We can use this to burn zombie.

Con: Limited fuel makes us sad
We can use this to burn zombie

Spam:
Pro: Delicious
Con: Zombie can smell it.
We can eat it.

Pro: We give it as a food so zombie is full. therefore we don’t get eaten by zombie.
Con: Useless.

Rope:
Pro: We can die without be a zombie.
We can use this to suicide

Blanket:
Pro: If we cover it, teacher will be angry and give him to ax, he kill zombie. [If we cover the teacher with the blanket he will be angry and then if we give him the axe he will kill the zombies]
Con: Next time we die
We can use this to cover dead friends.

 

Next post – a compilation of my favorite survival plans. As this is just the first day of MANY (at least 5) days of Halloween, consider this and the following post a work in progress.

It’s close to midnight and something evil’s lurking in the dark…

Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

ZOMBIES.

 

 

Okay so it’s October which means it’s time for my favorite holiday – Halloween! It’s never too early to start crafting the perfect Halloween lesson, so I’m soliciting advice.

Last year I did a zombie lesson for my advanced kids that went over well, but this year I’d like to do something  little more, let’s say, academic than just a speed read and “unconventional weapons bingo” (You can STAB a zombie with a HIGH HEELED SHOE. You can DISTRACT a zombie with KIMCHI). However, I do love zombies. I would like to do a lesson plan on how to survive a zombie apocalypse, but I need some sort of advanced grammar point to teach/practice, something preferably that supports reasoning (ex: so that).

I’ve been talking to the awesome Josh Brown who was a F*bright ETA last year in Naju and my awesome lesson planning buddy (and who I miss dearly) and these are the grammar points he came up:

SO THAT:
“I kill zombies so that I can live”

ONLY IF (and how sometimes the meaning changes if you reverse the order):
“I live only if I kill zombies”
“I kill zombies only if I live”

IN ORDER TO:
“I kill zombies in order to live”

and, not quite the same, but fun

AS IF:
“I walk as if I were a zombie”

Gentle readers, what do you think? Any suggestions in terms of grammar points, or essential zombie vocabulary (physical descriptors, weapons, locations for hideouts, etc) would be much appreciated.

Stay safe.

“Everyone at Sapgyo High School becomes a Zombie and Dies”

Monday, October 25th, 2010

So for Halloween I am going to teach a lesson plan on ZOMBIES to my upper levels. I just finished writing a speed read, so I thought I would share it with you. A speed read is when you give the students sheets of paper that have two sentences on them, one sentence begins with “when you hear” and one sentence begins with “you say.” There are maybe 30 or so slips of paper (one for every student) and together all the sheets create a story – BUT WAIT! The order is all mixed up! The only way that you can tell the story is to listen for the sentence before yours (i.e. “when you hear). The idea behind the speed read is to practice listening comprehension and speaking speed – because you have to say the story as fast as possible! Without further ado, my speed read, tenatively titled “Everyone at Sapgyo High School becomes a Zombie and Dies.”

You say: Emily Teacher was at Sapgyo High School on Halloween.

When you hear: Emily Teacher was at Sapgyo High School on Halloween.
You say: She was in her office preparing for the lesson.

When you hear: She was in her office preparing for the lesson.
You say: She heard the door slowly open.

When you hear: She heard the door slowly open.
You say: “Who is it?” She asked.

When you hear: “Who is it?” She asked.
You say: She heard someone say “braaaaaaaaiiiiiiinnnnnnnsssss”

When you hear: She heard someone say “braaaaaaaaiiiiiiinnnnnnnsssss”
You say: She looked at the door and saw a zombie!

When you hear: She looked at the door and saw a zombie!
You say: She was very scared.

When you hear: She was very scared.
You say: Zombies eat the brains of living people.

When you hear: Zombies eat the brains of living people.
You say: Also, if you are bitten by a zombie, you become a zombie.

When you hear: Also, if you are bitten by a zombie, you become a zombie.
You say: Emily Teacher does not want to be eaten by a zombie, or become a zombie!

When you hear: Emily Teacher does not want to be eaten by a zombie, or become a zombie!
You say: Emily Teacher quickly ran to the classroom.

When you hear: Emily Teacher quickly ran to the classroom.
You say: She locked the door and told the class to hide.

When you hear: She locked the door and told the class to hide.
You say: A zombie broke the door and came in!

When you hear: A zombie broke the door and came in!
You say: Isabella hit the zombie with a chair.

When you hear: Isabella hit the zombie with a chair.
You say: The zombie died.

When you hear: The zombie died.
You say: However first it bit Jacob!

When you hear: However first it bit Jacob!
You say: Jacob is now a zombie!

When you hear: Jacob is now a zombie!
You say: What do we do?

When you hear: What do we do?
You say: We need to kill Jacob.

When you hear: We need to kill Jacob.
You say: Emily took a chainsaw out of the desk and killed Jacob.

When you hear: Emily Teacher took a chainsaw out of the desk and killed Jacob.
You say: Jacob died, and Emily Teacher turned her back to the class.

When you hear: Jacob died, and Emily Teacher turned her back to the class.
You say: Rachel then fixed the door to stop the zombies from coming in.

When you hear: Rachel then fixed the door to stop the zombies from coming in.
You say: She said “look, now we are safe”

When you hear: She said “look, now we are safe”
You say: Irene said “what should we do now?”

When you hear: Irene said “what should we do now?”
You say: Emily Teacher said “braaaaaiiiiinnnnnnsssss”

When you hear: Emily Teacher said “braaaaiiiiinnnnnssss”
You say: Emily Teacher turned around and SHE WAS A ZOMBIE!

When you hear: Emily Teacher turned around and SHE WAS A ZOMBIE!
You say: The class screamed!

When you hear: The class screamed!
You say: Emily Zombie attacked the class!

When you hear: Emily Zombie attacked the class!
You say: Emily Zombie bit everyone!

When you hear: Emily Zombie bit everyone!
You say: The class then turned everyone at Sapgyo High School into zombies.

EDIT: Class 1.5 read this speed read in 59 seconds! WOW! MUCH faster than I was expecting… as there are 30 sentences that means that they spent an average of a  little less than 2 seconds on each sentence!  I pit them against class 2.1 and told them that whoever won would get stickers, so we’ll see what happens tomorrow…

Homework and Halloween

Thursday, November 5th, 2009

Well, I had a lovely picture of the tree I can see from my window all pretty and orangey-yellow, but my computer won’t let me upload it at the moment, so you’ll all have to take my word for the fact that fall in Salzburg is gorgeous. That is, when it’s not grey and rainy and disgusting outside as it seems to be frequently. We’ve been hanging around Salzburg for the passed two weeks getting caught up on homework and marveling at how fast our semester seems to be speeding by. Last week we had some classes canceled so I had lots of time to eat Halloween candy and hide away in the library doing research for my impossible asylum law research paper. I must say that the libraries here do not make research easy. We’re very lucky that so many of the books are in English, but a trip to the library really shouldn’t be such an ordeal. If you ever do manage to find the book (and the library! There’s one for pretty much every department.) you’re looking for you might not be able to check it out for more than a week. Blargh. But we’re managing. Taking a break from studying, Rachelle and I adventured all across town on Friday to find a Halloween store. Halloween is celebrated here, though it’s not as popular as at home. She bought a witch hat and I got some silly glasses that, when paired with my tie-dye shirt, improvised a fairly decent hippie costume. We put on our costumes later that day to have a little mini Halloween shindig with some friends, but I ended up spending actual Halloween working on the same ridiculous paper. And eating candy, so it counts as celebrating.

The rest of the weekend (and an added holiday made it a four day one) I probably didn’t leave the dorm more than twice. I was going a little stir crazy by the end of it, but when I look at the calendar and realize I don’t have another free weekend until December I knew I had to get as much work done as possible. This week the students here in Austria were protesting budget cuts that were affecting higher education so they were staging sit-ins in some of the classrooms and posting signs around the university. Our Austrian Culture had one of the students come in to explain the movement to us, and it was really interesting. They don’t pay any fees at all to go to a university here in Austria, and the threat of implementing even 300 Euro a year tuition prompts outrage. Such a strange concept to all of us who pay so much to go to school, but very interesting to get a real world example of how the Austrian welfare state plays out in reality.

Yesterday afternoon I was sitting in the room by myself when an Austrian man (a maintenance main perhaps?) came in and started speaking German to me. At first I assumed he was going to fix our only just barely functioning heater. Wrong. He actually wanted to measure our bed frames. Hmm. He had me help him hold the measuring tape and everything. He even measured mine twice. He kept mumbling to himself in German, and then he was gone just as quickly as he’d come. No idea what that was all about. Then last night instead of making dinner with the girls like a normal Wednesday, some friends and I decided to take advantage of student night at the Salzburg opera and went to see The Marriage of Figaro. It was very entertaining even if we had little concept of what was going on most of the time. Unlike the Vienna Opera, Salzburg’s only has subtitles in German so we had to rely on our German skills and my friend Kirsten, who had wisely read the story before we went, whispering basic plot points every so often. Of course any understanding we might have had went out the door when the show ended with random villagers coming to attack the main characters with pitchforks. Pretty sure Mozart didn’t write that part. Today I did laundry and rather than fight for the one dryer we have for our entire complex I now have clothing strewn about the room. I just hope some of it dries before I need to pack for Florence later this evening or I may just be breaking out the hairdryer so I have some dry sock. But that leads me to Florence! Italy! Rachelle, Rachel, and Kirsten and I have an overnight train at 9:15 tonight. Here’s to three days of pasta, pizza, gelato, and lots of wonderful museums.