Archive for the ‘lesson plan’ Category

Pet Peeves

Wednesday, June 12th, 2013

It annoys me when my students complain a lot, which is something they’ve been doing more and more frequently.

Teacher I’m tired!

Teacher, English is too hard!

Teacher, our school is a jail!

Teacher -

I understand that they are frustrated, and this time of year is especially difficult, but complaining never solved anything. Well, you know, except when it does. Squeaky wheel and all that.

In order for my squeaky wheels to get some grease, this week I’ve been teaching a lesson on annoyances and pet peeves, and how to complain in English. Politely. We start by watching a video showing some very annoying things and having students vote on whether or not it’s annoying and telling me why, playing annoyance human bingo (I show 25 pictures, they write them down on a bingo sheet, then they must interview each other to find students who think thing is annoying.) Then finally, I have them write down their annoyances on a piece of paper using three sentence structures:

My pet peeve is _________.

It annoys me when ____________.

It drives me up the wall when ______________.

It’s been really interesting reading their answers. The following are the noteable ones from eight of my ten second grade classes. Interestingly enough, most of the responses listed below are from female students. The female students on average were more interested in playing with the structures and expressing their own annoyances, while the male students were more likely to just use vocabulary we had studied in class. Some of the following are funny, but there are also a few sad complaints.

It drives me up the wall when my friend is annoyed and just express her annoyance though she doesn’t tell me the reason.

My pet peeve is being woken by song in the morning.

It drives me up the wall when I must take care of babies.

It drives me up the wall when someone acts like a fool.

It annoys me when Ethics teacher gives questions to me in class.

It annoys me when I’m soaked with sweat after showering and wearing clothes.

It drives me up the wall when parents inquire my report card.

It drives me up the wall when insects creep my body or my bed.

It drives me up the wall when I see cells picture in biology textbooks.

It annoys me when my leg muscle cramps are sudden.

It drives me up the wall when I stay with someone who are selfish and use abusive language.

It drives me up the wall when I’m constipated.

It annoys me when I watch a show and Father comes and turns the channel to a fishing program.

It annoys me when math questions are not be solved.

It annoys me when I see the person who long time no shower.

It drives me up the wall when he bites my arm. [...what?]

My pet peeve is someone speaks me with nervous tone.

It drives me up the wall when someone sings song very careless.

My pet peeve is bring no spoon when in cafeteria.

It annoys me when my character die in the game

It annoys me when someone play piano at night.

It drives me up the wall when I can’t do what I want.

It drives me up the wall when there are too many tests and too much undone homework.

It drives me up the wall when there is a hair on my bed.

[From the same girl - note, there are frogs that live in the rice paddy right next to the dormitory] My pet peeve is frog. It annoys me when the frogs crying. It drives me up the wall when the frogs appear in front of me.

It annoys me when I smell people’s smell.

It annoys me when people talk to me or treat me when I am concentrating,

My pet peeve is baby hair.

It drives me up the wall when JW show me his middle finger.

It annoys me when I was angried about trivial things. [meta...]

My pet peeve is someone ransack my personal thing.

It drives me up the wall when [people] say [I am a] pig. I’m not pig. Pig is CW.

It drives me up the wall when people make fun of me.

It annoys me when people who lend me the money don’t pay back money.

It annoys me when you say to me a “black” [this comes from a student who has darker skin, and thus is told all the time that he is "black." Based on my experiences, and my friends' experiences (both Korean and foreign) I can say that shadeism issues are rampant in Korean schools.]

It annoys me when people don’t understand me.

My pet peeves are girls who love me.

Teenagers

Wednesday, May 8th, 2013

In case anyone forgot that I teach teenagers… this should remind you.

During my “create your dream school” lesson, a group of boys created “Dating School.” There were many interesting aspects of Dating School, but the one that drew the most chuckles from the students during the presentations were the three clubs: night club, dance club, and “how to skinship” club. Skinship, for those of you that don’t live in Korea, is the term that Korean students use to describe physical displays of affection.

After each group presented, I gave the other students a chance to ask the group a question. After a few questions about how pretty the girls at Dating School would be and hemming and hawing, one boy raised his hand and, affecting a serious tone, asked how long it would take to master the skinship club. The group who created Dating School conferred with each other and decided it would take about three years.

Creating Countries

Sunday, May 5th, 2013

I had my students create their own countries. The results were a little weird.

Political System: Dictatorship
Industries: milk, beef, cheese
Official Language: Korean
Marrying Age: 18. Because NH wants to marry right now.
Military: Option
Educational System: 13, must
3 Things that are Legal: Must have cow, milk a cow, bow to cow
3 Things that are Illegal: Hate milk, hit the cow, raise other animal.

Political System: Anarchy
Industries: Troll’s underwear
Official Language: English and Troll
Marrying Age: No limitation (but can’t marry troll)
Military: Mandatory (both men and women)
Educational System: Have to go to school until 20 (but, troll cannot have school)
3 Things that are Legal: You can kill troll. Trolls can kill people. You can have weapons.
3 Things that are Illegal: Trolls cannot marry people. Murder. Trolls cannot suicide.

Political System: Monarchy
Industries: Time machine. Eco-friendly products.
Official Language: Korean and binary.
Marrying Age: 18 -> because ideal is grown enough at about 18.
Military: None.
Educational System: Students must go to school up to University or College (24)
3 Things that are Legal: 1. Time travel 2. Can dropout only if a person is studying. 3. Can go camping anywhere important in time or to the environment.
3 Things that are Illegal: Don’t Destroy: 1) Time 2) Environment 3) Humanism

Political System: Anarchy
Industries: medicine, plant, fruit, ant, sand
Official Language: animal sounds
Marrying Age: No limit
Military: Optional
Educational System: to survive in nature
3 Things that are Legal: watering the flowers, plant trees, produce butterflies
3 Things that are Illegal: pick up plants, stomping on ants, catch butterflies

Creating Countries

Sunday, May 5th, 2013

I had my students create their own countries. The results were a little weird.

Political System: Dictatorship
Industries: milk, beef, cheese
Official Language: Korean
Marrying Age: 18. Because NH wants to marry right now.
Military: Option
Educational System: 13, must
3 Things that are Legal: Must have cow, milk a cow, bow to cow
3 Things that are Illegal: Hate milk, hit the cow, raise other animal.

Political System: Anarchy
Industries: Troll’s underwear
Official Language: English and Troll
Marrying Age: No limitation (but can’t marry troll)
Military: Mandatory (both men and women)
Educational System: Have to go to school until 20 (but, troll cannot have school)
3 Things that are Legal: You can kill troll. Trolls can kill people. You can have weapons.
3 Things that are Illegal: Trolls cannot marry people. Murder. Trolls cannot suicide.

Political System: Monarchy
Industries: Time machine. Eco-friendly products.
Official Language: Korean and binary.
Marrying Age: 18 -> because ideal is grown enough at about 18.
Military: None.
Educational System: Students must go to school up to University or College (24)
3 Things that are Legal: 1. Time travel 2. Can dropout only if a person is studying. 3. Can go camping anywhere important in time or to the environment.
3 Things that are Illegal: Don’t Destroy: 1) Time 2) Environment 3) Humanism

Political System: Anarchy
Industries: medicine, plant, fruit, ant, sand
Official Language: animal sounds
Marrying Age: No limit
Military: Optional
Educational System: to survive in nature
3 Things that are Legal: watering the flowers, plant trees, produce butterflies
3 Things that are Illegal: pick up plants, stomping on ants, catch butterflies

Em in Asia! 2013-04-03 21:54:11

Wednesday, April 3rd, 2013

Practicing “might” and “may” with students sure does lead to interesting answers.

Okay guys, what is the smallest country in the world?

The smallest country in the world might be the Vatican!

Good! So what do you know about the Vatican? Who lives there?

THE KING OF THE PRIESTS.

… we generally call him the Pope.

Pink, Sparkly Lip Gloss

Tuesday, April 2nd, 2013

Makeup is against the dress code, but that doesn’t stop students from wearing it. Everyone’s heard my rants about students putting on foundation, concealer, eyelid tape (yes that is a thing), etc. Even though I’m at a high-level academic now, where way less students wear makeup than at SGHS, I’ve stopped batting an eye when students with their faces caked in makeup come up to me.

Today I did my create a country lesson for the first time in two years, for the first time since SGHS, actually. We talk about different things needed to create our own country (a political system, industry, education system, military, etc) and students make up their own country name, create a flag, and answer these questions.

One team made the “175 cm Country,” where all residents must be under 175 centimeters. They decorated their flag with short people, and then left what looks to be a pink, sparkly kiss. This is all well and good, until you realize that this was an all-boys class. As much as I hate to play into gender roles – considering makeup isn’t allowed and boys and girls aren’t allowed to talk to each other, where did this boy get the lip gloss from?!

Predictions

Monday, April 1st, 2013

I’ve been pretty hard on my second graders recently, and as an apology for teaching them a difficult lesson on the nuances between “hope” “wait” “expect” and “look forward to,” I’ve been teaching my students “might” and “may.” This lesson is really fun, because it’s very student-driven and slightly cultural, as I’ve been teaching them MASH.

Now for those of you that grew up under rocks, or perhaps in another country, MASH is a prediction game played mostly by middle school girls. You give someone a certain number of categories (spouse, car, number of children, career, and the place they will live) and have them choose two possibilities for each category. Then their partner chooses two possibilities for each category, leaving the original person with four possibilities. There is one final category that you do not have a say in, and that is your future living situation. This is where MASH gets its name, as you can live in a Mansion Apartment Shack or House. After choosing all of these, you make a spiral until the person whose fortune you’re predicting says “stop,” then you use the number of “lines” in the spiral (much like rings in a tree trunk) to tell the person’s future by counting and eliminating choices until you have one left in each category.

We then figured out everyone’s future and shared out answers using “may” and “might” (i.e. “I might marry __________. We may have _____ children.”)

The kids went nuts.

The girls loved it because they got to tell their own future. Almost all of them married their celebrity crushes, lived in exotic locations, and had great careers.

The boys loved it because they could mess with each other. The worst MASH fortune I saw was a student who lived in a house in the Seoul subway system with 100 children as a dancer married to an awkward comedian who drove, of all things, a Lamborghini.

Anyway, the point of this post is that it’s sometimes fun to bring back things from middle school dust them off and try them again, even if I’m STILL not married to Christian Bale, nor am I living in London (stupid middle school predictions).

This semester I…

Thursday, March 7th, 2013

“hope I can sleep tight.”

Wish vs. Hope

Tuesday, March 5th, 2013

As I don’t have to do a full-blown intro lesson with second grade, I taught my returning students the differences between “wish” and “hope.” We practiced constructing future hopes and wishes, and then wrote our self-introductions on index cards. Students would then come up to the front of the classroom, read other students’ index cards, and the class as a whole would have to try to guess which student wrote which card based on their wishes/hopes/hobbies/hometowns, etc. It was fun.

The way I tried to simply break it down was you use “hope” when something is possible or probable, and “wish” when something is impossible or improbable. For that reason, you can say “I hope I will go to sleep early” to signify that that (going to sleep early) is something that may actually happen, and you can say “I wish I could go to sleep early” when you have important work that you must do, and thus most likely will not be going to sleep early.

We brainstormed verbs in pairs, then I threw my classroom ball and whoever caught it had to volunteer a verb. The class as a whole created a phrase with the verb, then decided if that phrase was impossible/improbable/probable/possible and created a sentence together by plugging it into one of the two grammar structures I had left on the board [I wish I would/could; I hope I will].

Addict -> Break an addiction -> Break my addiction to computer games -> I wish I could break my addiction to computer games.

Here are some funny/sweet/weird ones (and ones I’m a little scared to leave up on the board) my students have come up with.

I hope I can talk to female students [this semester].
I wish I could invade Russia.
I wish I could burn down the school.
I wish I could walk to the sky.
I hope I can cure cancer.
I hope I can confess my secret.
I wish I could sleep in Emily’s class.

The First of the Last (Classes)

Monday, December 10th, 2012

This time of year’s always difficult, and it makes me glad that though I’m disorganized in every other aspect of my life, I’m intensely organized when it comes to my class schedule. If I hadn’t been, as there’s two weeks left in the semester, I wouldn’t have realized that this is my last week with most of my second grade classes and I wouldn’t have planned accordingly.

While I will be at CPHS for another 6 months, I won’t teach the second graders anymore. The Korean semester starts in March and ends in December, which means that the F*bright foreign teachers always start and leave halfway through the academic year. While I’m grateful my schedule is the way it is as it allowed me to go straight from university to Korea without a multi-month delay, it can be annoying. The students will graduate and move up a grade, which means that while I have a new incoming batch of first graders to teach, I lose my second graders because they become third graders, high school seniors, and focus on the college entrance exam. It’s sad all around.

For the second graders I did a lesson on yearbooks. Thanks to my lovely parents (<3) I was able to get scanned photos from my high school yearbook and bring in a CPHS yearbook and compare and contrast them.

Senior year picture. The students say that I look younger now. Can you find me? Hint – top left.

We then went over yearbook signing traditions (in Korea there’s a similar thing called “rolling paper,” but that’s separate from yearbooks. The yearbooks are only for graduating seniors) and I taught them some common acronyms like “TTYL,” “LYLAS,” etc. I then had them come up with their own acronyms that they could use to describe their own CP experience. I had made “yearbooks” with their class pictures on B4 paper and printed out one for each student. They then used their own acronyms and the ones that I taught them to sign each other’s “yearbooks.” Here are my favorite acronyms thus far (4/10 classes done):

IS – In Seoul (i.e. after CPHS they’ll all meet in Seoul, where the best universities are)

CID – Chicken in Dormitory

HACKLOT – Have Chicken A Lot

ROC – Rob of Convenience Store (i.e. they buy everything)

WITM – What is Today’s Menu?

DWWU – Don’t Wanna Wake Up

LT – Lunch Terrible

FCTSKY – From CP To SKY (SKY are the three top universities – Seoul, Korea, and Yonsei)

ILSSM – I love 순대 (sunde), 순대 (sunde) loves me (Sunde is a food that CP is famous for… it’s… well, you can look it up.)

TOTE – Turn on the Egg (i.e. the Olleh wifi egg)

LLT – Love Lunch Time

LS3 – Let’s Study/Sing/Sleep

YSC – YS is Coming (YS is Awesome Mr. Kim’s first name, this class’s homeroom teacher)

COW – Chicken Over Wall (The students aren’t allowed to have food delivered, and there’s a fence around school property, so students get chicken delivered to them “over the wall.” Apparently this is a pretty popular phenomenon at most schools, as evidenced by my friend Sam’s more extreme example of rope chicken)

EIS – Everyone in Seoul (similar to IS)

BUIC – Break Up in Christmas

NB – No Boys (remember, this is a super conservative co-ed but gender segregated school)

SOS – Sick of Studying

RTC – Run to Cafeteria

CPH – Chicken Pizza Heungbu (the CP trifecta: Heungbu is the name of our bakery).

These are all from my girls’ classes… I’m excited to see what the boys come up with, but I’m not excited to teach more last classes.