Archive for the ‘The day to day stuff’ Category

What have I gotten myself into?

Thursday, February 11th, 2010

Some say that am I a brave person for going to a country that I had very limited experience on the culture and no knowledge in the language, but I completely saw coming to Korea as an adventure, and living a dream. I left the States without looking back because I knew that I, and anyone else, can make it in another place as long as they had an open mind about things… but I guess that I shocked myself when the words: “What have I gotten myself into?” floated in my mind only hours into my flight…

Those lovely words spread across my mind like a butter on hot toast the first night I had arrived at my apartment. My temporary Korean roomates had ordered take out, which is very common here, and they offered me some of their food. What sat in front of me was traditional Korean food, a type of food that I had only tasted twice; first, at the “Korean exchange student good-bye dinner” at my home university; and second, on the airplane ride to Korea, when I first experienced  Bibimbap ( which was the actual first moment that I questioned my survival in Korea.) On the tray the stewardess handed me, was what I believed to be mini-fish. I confirmed it with the couple that neighbored me, as her husband chewed on the little sardine. “They are very salty and crunchy!” he told me. There were other things on the tray that I questioned- “What are those yellowish rubes? What kind of sauce is that, where does it go? What is that clear stuff ?” I wasnt consuming anything till all my questions were answered. I was really worried that once I had arrived in Korea, nor the next meal the stewardess handed me, I wouldn’t be able to eat anything, in fear of what it could be.

Above: Bibimbap

Above: Bibimbap

Its silly, I know. How can one be afraid of trying new food? I dunno. Really.  But if there is anything that I have learned in my expearience here in Korea, is that you just kinda have to dive in, with no fear, and just try stuff, food and all. There are types of food here that I had no idea existed, nor could be consumed.  In my first night, I was educated on “korean style” of cutting your food. One of my roommates came back from the kitchen into the living area with a  pair of sharp shears when I had complain that the meat was very big. She picked up the cooked pork ankle pieces and chopped each with the shears, and looked at me satisfied. She looked at me and said “no knife, this is Korean Style!” I have been living in Korea since late August, and I am still yet to see one knife.

Above: "Korean Style"- first Korean meal after arrival

Above: "Korean Style"- first Korean meal after arrival

just another day in the life- in Seoul:

Thursday, February 11th, 2010
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Above: The view I love waking up to

Techniquely, I am still on Winter Break from my university here in Seoul, so my normal day-to-day life, isn’t as it would normally be if I was stuck with 6 classes during the semester. Being on a 2 and a half month break is great- but it  has its ups and down. Feeding into sterotypical “poor college student,” my break hasn’t been as adventurous as I had hoped, but there is still plenty of time in the coming weeks and semester to live life a bit more excitingly…

My days normally start off with me waking up to my cell phone alarm, followed by me scrabbling in my bed in search of that ratty ol’ thing. Once I find it, I reset it to an even later hour. I fumble out of bed, eventually, and make it into my living room where my computer takes rest. I look out at of my window and glare at my view, I image what kind of view I would have if it wasn’t for the enormous apartment complexs that surrounded me. Its a comforting feeling, to know that Im surrounded by other families living in the 6 other apartment bulidings on 18 other floors living around me- it gives my apt a homey feel.

I live with 8 other females, or did (now that its break, roomies are either moving back or just visiting home). I live in the “international apartment”- my roomates are from the United States, China, Tawain, Japan, and Korea. If you have ever lived with a group of females, you would know how at times it can be “difficult,” to say the least, but in this case, I havent really felt any sense of an estrogen battle. Rather, just interesting times, involving the TV, loud K-Pop, and tons of screaming…. o and did I mention the dance moves??!